Backgrounds

Backgrounds are traits that describe special advantages and how the character earned them. Backgrounds can only be purchased at character creation, then characters are given 5 points to spend, with each Background dot costing 1 point. They are also assigned a point value from 1-5 similar to Attributes and Abilities.

Allies: Those willing to help you, they can vary from a police officer to a trainer in the gym.
Cipher: A passive Background rather than an active one that requires a roll. It's more of an invisible data shield between your character and all those nasty people who want to find out who or what you are. It isn't any form of physical protection, rather it is a Difficulty applied to any attempt to learn knowledge about you. Cipher isn't a deliberately acquired Background, in many ways it is harder to create than it is to acquire naturally. Those with high Cipher ratings could have been born below the poverty line and outside the system. Their isn't information on you, simply because you never were entered into the system. If you wish to maintain your Cipher rating then you must do things to insure it, like preventing people from acquiring your fingerprints, pictures of you, or your personal information. Cipher can be very useful for a Trinity Agent to have. A high Cipher rating isn't always beneficial. A credit check can't be run on you. If you have a high Cipher rating you have problems with "lost" hotel reservations, "missed" hovercar payments, and "nonexistent" bank accounts.
Clearance: In many ways, Clearance is a direct counterpoint to Cipher. Clearance represents a character's ability to access data that may be encrypted, hidden, or classified under various levels of secrecy. This Background may stem From a legitimate right to know or it may be the result of months of searching for backdoors and stealing passwords. Clearance generally adds to the dice pool of any attempt to unearth rare or hidden data and cancels the Cipher rating of the search target on a one-for-one basis. Thus, a character with Clearance 2 searching for information on an individual with Cipher 3 makes her Engineering (Computer) roll at +1 difficulty, not +3. Note that Clearance is only good for Finding data that's on the OpNet or in an offline archive that the character would otherwise be denied access to; it won't help find information that wasn't written down, no matter how hard the character looks. Neither does Clearance help with attempts to circumvent computer fail-safes. So if the data in question is stored in a vault, applying Clearance is like pinning on a Fake ID badge; hacking is like using a set of lock picks (note that Clearance is purely the electronic equivalent of the ID badge and doesn't really help the character get into a physical vault).

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None: like most individuals, you don't have any special access to information
Minimal: you know a few back doors. Extensive: you have the passcodes for a couple of classified archives.
Comprehensive: top secrecy is no bar to your queries.
Extensive: you have the passcodes for a couple of classified archives.
Disturbing: you have a degree of access greater than that of many high officials whose databases you regularly plunder.
Electronically Omniscient: if it's out there, you know the codes that will get you into it.
Contacts: Are willing to give you information, they can vary from politicians and police to bureaucrats. Contacts aren't exceptionally close friends like Allies or Followers are, nor do they want to Mentor or train you. Instead they are casual acquaintances that can be used to get information or to contact and deal with the black market. A Contact won't take many risks on your behalf, but they don't take as much maintenance as Allies or Followers do. A good Contact can get you information that you wouldn't normally have access to, or the ability to acquire goods that you normally couldn't, and they can easily be written off if compromised. Of course this works two ways, Contacts will not, normally, take special actions to keep your identity secret.
Fame: A double edged sword, it can get you premium treatment, but what you do attracts attention.
Influence: The ability to change something in society, it can vary from political where you can get someone's power turned off to judges who can issue search warrants.
Followers: Like Allies, these characters should be fully developed. However, like Contacts, Followers aren't likely to be as powerful as the character with whom they usually deal (unless one Follower is taken as a three-point or higher Background). They're aides, bodyguards, chauffeurs, boyfriends, publicity managers, secretaries, interpreters... but never independent characters capable of taking the spotlight away from the main heroes, the player characters, Also like Allies, followers need a certain amount of care and respect, lest they find someone else deserving of their loyalty. Remember that Followers don't necessarily have to be human. While true AIs aren't yet in existence in Trinity (with the possible exception those that are far outside the reach of player characters), an advanced SI is almost as good. Also, the occasional Qin diplomat might take it into its head to follow a human or group of humans for unspecified purposes. Likewise, trained animals can be good Followers if the setting is right - especially BEngiBeasts (see the Trinity Tech, Manual, page 106).
Identity:
The Identity Background is quite difficult to acquire and is usually bestowed upon a trusted tie by an organization that deals in secrecy and deceit. This Background represents a full cover identity, complete with falsified records and identification documents. Note that this Background isn't always for malicious purposes. Many Norca maintain alternate identities as a matter of course, in case they have to hide out for a while. It's something of a fashion among some clairsentient factions to go on walkabout under an assumed name in order to discover higher truths about one's true self. Higher level of identity usually incorporate some amount of independent Influence or Status; these Backgrounds only function when the character is operating within the assumed ldentlty's expected role. An Orgoteko operative masquerading as an FSA government official couldn't use his FSA Status to convince his Orgotek superior to reassign him.
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None you only have your real name and face.
Flimsy: You've got official current records that stand up to a casual glance, along with a passport and a bank account. You have one point of Status in the organization to which your cover identity holds Allegiance.
Sturdy: Your record sand documents can handle casual scrutiny, up to the level given during international travels or misdemeanor arrests. Your cover identity has two points split between Influence and Status.
Upper middle class: this individual is doing quite well for herself. She owns either a commuter vehicle and a suburban home (a relative rarity in the overpopulated 22nd century) or a worn and weary spaceship of the "small transport" category. Before expenses, she pulls down around Cr 5,000 a week; afterwards, she has about Cr 1,000 to spend or save. 1f she put everything she owns up for auction, she'd gather the modest sum of Cr 750,000. An individual with this level of Resources can support two employees, dependents, or guests at the Resources 1 level without affecting her permanent stability, but things will be tight in the short term.
Solid:
it would take a detailed records check to uncover your duplicity. You have three points to allocate between the influence and Status of your other self.
Ironclad: even the Ron Trinity would have difficulty finding out that this ldentity doesn't "really" exist. Your records are more complete than those of many actual people. The person you claim to be has a total of four dots of Influence and Status.
Influence:influence is a measure of a character's ability to get ordinary society to do her bidding. Influence can be from an official source, as in an elected official or a police officer, or it can come from unofficial sources such as the traditional "15 minutes of fame" Influence is not always universally recognized--a UN Special Inspector may find that she's quite well--respected on the upper levels of Luna but trying to throw her weight around out in the Belt may get her into more trouble than its worth. For that matter, Influence can also be a bad thing when a character is trying to keep a low profile ("Hey, wait a minute! Aren't you Wade Cox? 1 saw you on Strike Team last month! I'm Your biggest fan!"). Accordingly, players should specify just where their character's influence originates. Influence is a rather general form of authority. Players who want their characters to have specific forms of leverage, such as law enforcement powers, are directed to the Merits and Flaws section.
Mentor: Someone who you can confide in and is willing to train you.

Requisition: Many pieces of standard equipment listed in the various Trinity books are labeled "restricted." 'This indicates that they are only available to personnel with the correct training and certification. Requisition is a measure of the character's ability to acquire such items, whether through honest competence and authorization ("Checked out on it Hell, I wrote the operator's manual!") or less honest means (Hey, don't worry, my money's always good."). Characters with high Requisition tend to be military or law enforcement personnel as most restricted items are held tightly by the authorities due to their potential to cause massive damage. Note that requisitioning something does not automatically grant the character the ability to use it properly, nor does it supply personnel to help operate a requisitioned item. Requisition usually lasts for a specified period of time - these items common place, and they need to be returned to the armory once the mission's over. Note that some of the following examples refer to items published in the Trinity Technology Manual.

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None: you only have access to civilian or standard-issue hardware.
Minimal: you can get your hands on law enforcement equipment that's little or no direct threat to other people, such as a Wazukana Lt. Bushido or DataWarp Patton computer agent or a shock ring.
Useful: you have the ability to acquire items that violate privacy or electronics laws - surveillance equipment, an advanced implant radio or a reality--grade hologram projector. Alternately, you can access mass-produced military-grade small arms up to a coil carbine.
Dangerous: you're cleared to use advanced espionage/covert operations bioapps such as a wing pack or a poison glove, vehicles with armor options and nonlethal weapons and experimental (still in field testing or first-generation technology) military small arms like plasma pistols. Deadly if the assignment warrants it, you can acquire demolitions equipment, support weapons, or (if you have a properly-certified operator on hand to take control of it) a military vehicle or light VARG. You can also access the Psicomm Net or garner space for a team on an out bound Leviathan mission (though scheduling or redirecting a Leviathan mission is beyond the capabilities of player characters).
"Sorry, maybe next game:" you are authorized to deploy tactical fusion warheads or Code lndigo bioapps ... but you'll have to explain yourself if you use them.
Resources: An abstract measure of money, or power that can be used to purchase goods or services. (See Resources in the How to Play the Game section.)
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No Resources has a run down one room apartment with sporadic electricity or barely maintains his share of a larger shared dwelling. More commons they live on the street or in the wilderness.
Average college student
with a small apartment no larger than two bedrooms, and they probably don't have reliable transportation. After expenses she has about Cr 100 per week in spending money with Cr 200- Cr 600 in cash reserves. If they sell off everything they can raise about Cr 5,000 cash.
Stable: A character at this level of financial stability is relatively comfortable. Her expenses are a bit higher than someone with one dot in Resources but she also has a steadier flow of income and more savings in the bank. She earns about Cr 1,000 a week before expenses and has maybe Cr 250 to play with or save up after she pays her bills. She's most likely got a large apartment or a small townhouse, a workhorse computer, a handgun if her profession so dictates, and maybe a used vehicle in decent condition. Her savings are in the Cr 2,000-Cr 6,000 range, and she could sell off everything she owns to get about Cr 50,000 if she were absolutely pressed.
Upper Middle Class: this individual is doing quite well for herself. She owns either a commuter vehicle and a suburban home (a relative rarity in the overpopulated 22nd century) or a worn and weary spaceship of the "small transport" category. Before expenses, she pulls down around Cr 5,000 a week; afterwards, she has about Cr 1,000 to spend or save. 1f she put everything she owns up for auction, she'd gather the modest sum of Cr 750,000. An individual with this level of Resources can support two employees, dependents, or guests at the Resources 1 level without affecting her permanent stability, but things will be tight in the short term.
Wealthy: An individual with this degree of wealth definitely qualifies as upper class. owns a city home and a vacation home, or one larger residence - perhaps a pressurized dome Mars, a well-off ranch in the outback or a medium-sized interplanetary freighter. They possesses luxury vehicle or two utilitarian ones and may, on her job, have access to exotic weaponry. Her usual weekly income is in the Cr 10,00 range, of which she has around Cr 3,000 to play with or re-invest after paying off expenses. Were she to sell everything, she'd pull in around Cr 1.5 million. She has the financial wherewithal to support a handful of employees at a Resources 2 level without an inconvenient level of drain. Note that Resources 4 is above the pay range of all but the most experienced order-affiliated psions; most characters with this level of Resources need a good explanations as to the source of their money. Paradoxically, freelance psions often make more than their order-employed counterparts, unlike freelancers in many other fields.
Filthy Rich:
Resources need a good explanations as to the source of their money. Paradoxically, freelance psions often make more than their order-employed counterparts, unlike freelancers in many other fields. This character is about as rich as you can get without being the head of a small metacorporation - and for that matter, if she has the appropriate Backgrounds in other places, she may be the head of a small metacorp. She has the proverbial "more money than God," and is pulling in something on the order of Cr 200,00 a week, with a good Cr 60,000 of that remaining after the bills are taken care of. Her total value, were she to check, is in the Cr 20 million range, and she can afford to pay a couple of Resources 4 right-hand men and a staff of a dozen Resources 3 underlings and a score of Resources 2 flunkies. A character with this level of Resources needs a darn good reason for it, and must either devote a substantial portion of her time to managing her funds or have an executive assistant or investment banker as a full-time Follower or Contact. Most individuals with Resources 5 are neutrals - only the most elite psions are in positions to draw this sort of income.
Retainers: Those that serve you.
Status: Position in society that reflects one's station in life. Status measures a character's standing in one particular organization. Note that this isn't necessarily actual measure of rank; an incompetent buffon who's somehow managed to attain the rank colonel may have less Status than a tactical genius lieutenant. A character with Status 3 or higher needs to have a reason for such a position and will have a large stack of responsibilities that they need to juggle lest they lose some of that Status. A character's Status isn't necessarily in the organization as her Allegiance, although this the most common situation. Further, she can have in more than one organization (such as a on detached duty with the UN). If a character tries to apply Status from one to another ("But I'm a high-ranking Orgotek executive!) I should talk to your Legion field commande immediately!"), the effect depends on the state of relations between her "parent" organization and the one she's trying to influence ("Eh, sod off, ye wanker, what d'ye know about covert ops?"). Closely allied groups, such as the CSA and the FSM, generally recognize Status at one level lower. Loosely allied groups, such as Ron and the orders, will usually carry Status over at the cost of two levels. Groups that are coolly neutral toward one another, like lSRA and the Norca, tend to recognize each other's Status as three levels lower. Obviously, organizations that are having poor relations won't recognize Status from the enemy at all, except to determine how rudely the character is treated.
 

Additional backgrounds can be found at the White Wolf World of Darkness Website, or at Dark Mush Wiki.

A driver's license is a background or merit; what's the difference? Graduating from the class that teaches it is a Knowledge (allowing you to put points in the Drive Ability). The ability to corner like a race car driver is a talent, and the simple ability to drive itself is a skill (Ability). A background is previous knowledge or a previous condition. A Merit is more like a reward; there is only a shade of a difference between the two.

As citizens of Great Britain with an international passport, as well as a birth certificate. They may choose to forgo one or more of these for one background point.

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